Wild Birds Unlimited Newsletter
~ For those passionate about birding and nature ~
July 2019                                                                                          Volume 7.19
  
Where have all the birds gone? 
 
Summer is here and activity at bird feeders drops. Many customers wonder if is due to the summer heat or plentiful natural food. Contrary to what you may be witnessing at your feeders, birds are very busy this time of year.
Mid to late summer is an exciting and active time for birds. It is also a transitional period for them as they get ready for fall and winter. Even though it may not be as easily witnessed, there's still quite a lot going on in the bird world this time of year. The breeding season is not yet over for many of our backyard bird species. Many songbirds have two to three broods, or hatchings, so some are still raising their young.
Mourning doves have a particularly prolonged breeding season. These common Washoe County birds can have up to six broods per year, so it's not unusual to hear the mating coos of the male and see nesting doves this month.
American and lesser goldfinches, common backyard birds, are some of the last species to breed. They generally wait until late summer when many plants have gone to seed and food is plentiful. They usually nest in the out laying areas near water, then return to urban birdfeeders with their babies.
 
Beginning in August other species will have finished breeding and are getting ready to migrate. By the end of that month, many songbirds have started to molt, a systematic process of replacing feathers. Molting generally kicks in after breeding because it's very calorie-intensive activity.
Many bird species undergo a complete molt on or near their breeding grounds, which allows them to migrate south with a new set of feathers.
Our backyard birds tend to become secretive while molting, vocalizing infrequently and hiding in the vegetation. That's because they're more vulnerable to predators during molt, especially when growing new flight feathers. It may take weeks or months for them to complete the molting cycle. During this time the activity at your feeders may be slowed.
During this time it is also very important to provide a fresh water source in your yard. That can be in the form of a birdbath, fountain or natural water feature. It is a critical resource for them not only for hydration but as a means to keep new flight feathers clean and ready for the upcoming journey ahead. Make sure to clean your water source regularly to prevent mold and bacteria to build up which could cause illness in your local bird species.
By reducing but not eliminating the number of feeders or food types in your backyard you can ensure that later in the year you will get a return of those birds you treasure once their summer jobs come to an end. Be patient and enjoy every season!
Happy Birding.
Carmel
 
Click here to go to the Moana Nursery Website for more information
 
Wild Birds Unlimited
Rewards Members Special!   

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All small (28oz) seed cylinders
 

Easy way to feed and keep it tidy too!

 
 

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Keeping Bird Food Fresh
Here are some tips for keeping bird seed fresh:



  1. Always store your bird seed in a cool and dry location outside of your home.
  2. Store bird seed in rodent and insect-proof containers.
  3. Never mix old seed with new seed.
  4. During periods of warm weather, store only the amount of seed that your birds can consume over a two-week period.
  5. During the cooler winter weather, store only the amount of seed your birds can consume over a four-week period.
  6. Keep your bird feeders filled with a one- or two-day supply of seed to ensure it is eaten quickly and stays fresh.
  7. Discard moldy, rancid or foul-smelling seed, because it can be a health hazard to birds.



Going for the Goldfinches!
 


Upcoming Events


Lahontan Audobon Society

Friday, July 12 7:00am
Field Trip - Silver Saddle ranch

Thursday, July 18  5:30pm
Birds & Books Reading/Discussion Group - How To Be a Good Creature - a Memoir in Thirteen Animals by Sy Montgomery

Friday, July 26  7:00am
Field Trip - Thomas Creek Canyon


Tahoe Institute of Natural Science
   Go to Tinsweb website for full list of outings 
 
Sun Jul 07 @ 9:00AM - 01:00PM
Wed Jul 10 @ 7:00PM - 09:00PM
Wed Jul 17 @ 9:00AM - 01:00PM
Sun Jul 21 @ 9:00AM - 

Nature Happenings


* NABA National Butterfly count.
* Our longest days bring our highest average temperatures, and all those thunderstorms make for our second wettest month.
* Rufous Hummingbirds visit mid-month on their southbound leg of the longest migration distance of any bird for its size. 
* Calliope Hummingbirds, our smallest bird in North America, also visit on their southern migration.
* Black-chinned Hummingbirds spill over from the mountains and visit feeders.
* American and Lesser Goldfinches are our last birds to nest, waiting for mature thistle plants to provide nesting material and food for their young. 
* Robins have finished nesting but will readily visit yards in search of worms and berries. Plant berry-producing shrubs or offer cherries, cranberries, raisins, grapes or blueberries to help robins feed their young.
* Delta Aquarids Meteor shower peaks in late-July.

                                        
Nature Happenings

* NABA National Butterfly count.
* Our longest days bring our highest average temperatures
* Rufous Hummingbirds visit mid-month on their southbound leg of the longest migration distance of any bird for its size. 
* Calliope Hummingbirds, our smallest bird in North America, also visit on their southern migration.
* Black-chinned Hummingbirds spill over from the mountains and visit feeders.
* American and Lesser Goldfinches are our last birds to nest, waiting for mature thistle plants to provide nesting material and food for their young. 
* Robins have finished nesting but will readily visit yards in search of worms and berries. Plant berry-producing shrubs or offer cherries, cranberries, raisins, grapes or blueberries to help robins feed their young.
* Delta Aquarids Meteor shower peaks in late-July.


Feed Our Local Birds!
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Moana Nursery | 1100 W. Moana Lane | 11301 S. Virginia St. | 7655 Pyramid Hwy. | Reno/Sparks | NV | 89509