Mint … Can’t Get (Grow) Enough!

Pluck a sprig of mint and crush it between your fingers and you’ll release a cool distinctive fragrance not matched by any other plant. But mint doesn’t just smell good–it packs a mighty punch of flavor, too.

Mint can be very invasive, so it does need caution. Given good conditions, it will happily take over your garden. But who said you have to plant it in the ground? If you want something to take over your yard (perhaps a grass alternative), one of the creeping mints can be a good choice for a groundcover. But if you want to keep mint contained, the best way is to grow it in a container. It spreads rapidly by shallow rhizomes, so if the roots can get out of an area, it will pop up elsewhere. We recommend planting mint in containers and putting them on tables where the wonderful fragrance can be closer to your nose and you can easily pluck a sprig or three, without bending. They go nicely on a sunny kitchen windowsill during winter, too.

Since mint is a shallow-rooted plant, you can plant it in low, 12-18 inch wide bowls. When the plant gets too crowded, simply cut it in half and re-pot with fresh potting soil. Keep your plants moist and feed occasionally–that’s it.

Mint leaves can be harvested regularly and enjoyed. Just pinch as needed. It is best when picked early in the morning. To dry mint, cut the stalks just above the first set of leaves, as soon as the flower buds appear. Hang upside down in a dark, well ventilated room for two weeks or more.

Don’t limit yourself to one kind of mint. There are dozens of varieties available and each one has its own unique flavor. Mint can be used to flavor drinks and salads, it can be made into a jelly and vinegars to flavor meats, and some, like chocolate mint, will make you think you’ve just eaten dessert.

And, we’ve just scratched the surface of the uses and benefits of the Mighty Mint.

So go ahead and give your energy a boost, refresh your spirit and revitalize your senses. Plant some mint today!

This entry was posted on Saturday, March 18th, 2017 at 12:49 am and is filed under Children and Gardening, Gardening, Organic & Green. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.